landing page

How to Create a Landing Page That Drives 10X More Qualified Traffic

Drives 10X more qualified traffic with high converting landing pages

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Landing pages are a tough nut to crack. They can be time-consuming and difficult to create, especially if you don’t have any landing page templates or landing page builders to help you out.

If your splash page isn’t performing at its best, it might be because you haven’t followed the six steps outlined in this article! Follow these steps every time you create new landing pages for 10x better results than before.

You’ve heard about opt-in pages. They’re a marketing staple for any company that wants to get more leads and make more money, especially in the age of online advertising like Facebook and Google AdWords ads.

But landing pages can be tough to design from scratch, so this article will teach you how to create splash pages that work 10x better than before by following these six steps that will make your landing page conversion rates skyrocket!

What is a landing page?

optimizing landing pages

A landing page is a specifically formatted landing web page that’s used to drive traffic to the website landing page. 

Opt-in pages are landing web pages where the goal is to get visitors to click on one or more links, usually marked with text or graphics. Landing pages are specifically designed for promotional purposes, and landing page builders help with making landing pages.

Other names for a landing page include a splash page, a squeeze page, a lead magnet page, an opt-in page, a gift page, a capture page, a preview call invite page, and a free offer page.  That’s 8 other names for a landing page.

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Why use landing pages?

Why landing pages are important: splash pages are one of the most powerful ways to generate business.

They’re landing web pages specifically designed for revenue purposes, and landing page builders help create opt-in pages. 

Landing pages can be landing web pages where the goal is to get visitors to click on one or more links, usually marked with text or graphics.

Opt-in pages are specifically designed for promotional purposes, and landing page builders help with squeeze page creation.

Opt-in pages are a marketing staple for any company that wants to make money, and landing page conversion rates have been skyrocketing thanks to these six steps.

How to create landing pages that drive 10X more qualified traffic

create landing pages qualified traffic

Splash pages are web pages typically used for promotional purposes, and landing page builders help with landing page creation.

Capture pages can be landing web pages where the goal is to get visitors to click on one or more links, usually marked with text or graphics.

Lead magnet pages are typically designed for promotional purposes, and landing page builders help with landing page creation.

Why landing pages: As discussed in our blog post, capture pages are some of the most powerful ways to generate business. They’re landing web pages that drive traffic specifically for revenue-generating purposes and squeeze page builders to help you out with landing page creation.

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Six steps to make your landing page conversion rates soar!

1) Create a compelling headline

Your headline should compel readers to take action on what they’re reading about. It’s the difference between landing on a landing page and landing in a sales funnel.

2) Create a relevant offer

Your entire lead magnet pages should be leading up to this. They have to have a reason to enter their email, so take advantage of it. We recommend offering them something free in return for their email address so you can get your message in front of them later.

3) Create a landing page that matches what people see in PPC ads

You want people to immediately know that they’re in the right place when they arrive at your squeeze page, don’t you? If you paid for an ad on Google or Facebook, there’s going to be messaging built right into the landing page because it’ll take what people saw in your ad.

4) Create landing page variations

Test, test, and test again! Don’t just create one landing page template and expect it to convert. You’ll waste so much time testing opt-in pages that you would’ve already earned more than enough money with another landing page. Try different layouts, design elements, color schemes, copy… the possibilities are endless!

5) Keep landing pages simple

The splash page should never be more than 6-7 steps deep. People don’t like waiting for information or taking too many steps to get something done (like giving you their email address), so limiting the number of things they have to click on will lead them straight to your conversion goal.

6) Add CTAs throughout landing pages

A landing page isn’t complete if it doesn’t have CTAs (call-to-actions) popping up where visitors can click on the landing page to take the next step in their landing page journey. You want them to move from one lead magnet pages section to another, don’t you? 

If they’re dropping off instead of taking the desired action, add more CTAs with a related offer.

Now let’s take a look at high-converting landing pages tips for your success. 

15 tips for creating landing pages that convert visitors into customers

Tip #1: Optimize landing pages for conversions

Tip #2: Include a clear value proposition

Tip #3: Provide an engaging incentive

Tip #4: Provide actionable guidance on what to do next

An example of a landing page that provides this done is the lead magnet pages on Matrix Marketing Group (digital marketing agency).

They provide directions on what to do next on their landing page. This is good because it gives people the information they need without them having to look for it. They also provide an incentive by offering free access to their platform.

Tip #5: Structure opt-in pages for optimal conversions

An example of a landing page that provides this done is the landing page on SharpSpring (CRM and marketing automation platform). They provide directions on what to do next on their opt-in pages. 

This is good because it gives people the information they need without them having to look for it. They also provide an incentive by offering free access to their platform.

Tip #6: Use landing pages and A/B tests strategically

An example of a landing page that uses lead magnet pages and A/B tests strategically is Google Adwords. 

The A/B testing allows them to improve the quality of ads constantly. The A/B testing implemented in Google constantly changes certain images, opt-in pages, ad text, and landing page titles.

Tip #7: Create splash pages that are relevant to your business

An example of a landing page relevant to a business landing page is LinkedIn’s landing page for their Recruiter product. The lead magnet page provides the necessary information relevant to working with recruiters. 

Tip #8: Promote capture pages through paid ads

Examples of landing pages that use paid advertisements are Facebook Ads and Google Adwords campaigns. They both provide ways to find people interested in what you’re offering (through interests or keywords) and narrow it down to specific opt-in pages. They also provide a guide on how to create effective lead magnet pages for your business.

Tip #9: A/B test your splash pages

An example of an opt-in page that uses A/B testing is Facebook Ads. The A/B testing allows them to improve the quality of ads constantly. 

The A/B testing implemented in Google constantly changes certain images, opt-in pages, ad text, and lead magnet page titles. 

They run several different tests concurrently before launching it live to get the most out of their campaigns. This allows them to learn from mistakes early on and not make the same one twice.

A good example of a landing page that uses this tip successfully is Runkeeper’s landing page. It has a clear squeeze page and value proposition and is optimized for conversions (including endorsements on the landing page). 

They also provide actionable guidance on what to do next, such as signing up or creating an account by offering blog posts that help explain how it’s done easily.

Tip #10: Don’t make landing pages feel like advertisements

An example of a landing page that doesn’t make an opt-in page feel like an advertisement is the AdEspresso Facebook Ads squeeze page

Their squeeze page doesn’t have ads plastered all over the place, and instead, they focus on providing information without looking too cluttered. 

They also give tips on creating better ads based on their experience with marketing trends and strategies. This reiterates the idea that squeeze pages are meant to be useful for the person viewing them.

Tip #11: A landing page should do one thing or have one goal

An example of a landing page that does one thing is Keap’s landing page. Their landing page provides a clear direction (by having “Get Started Now” as its main call to action). Also, their site closely matches the overall branding of their product. 

This makes it consistent and easier because people already know how to navigate around their website.

An example of an opt-in page that has one goal is the Tesco opt-in page. The landing (or home) page’s purpose is to provide visitors with information about Plus membership and the benefits associated with it. 

It also provides links to relevant squeeze pages based on the product it’s trying to sell. All links take visitors to opt-in pages that further promote and highlight the benefits of signing up.

Tip #12: The landing page should be placed in a high traffic area

An example of a landing page placed in a high-traffic area is the PayPal lead magnet page.

Their landing/homepage highlights their service and contains their contact information so people can easily get in touch with them for transactions or refunds if need be. They also list relevant products such as Venmo and Xoom, making it easier for prospective customers who want these added features.

A landing page that isn’t placed in a high-traffic area is the Tumblr homepage. Although it provides great information about what Tumblr is, squeeze pages don’t exist on the site, forcing people to learn more about Tumblr through other means (such as Google or blogs). 

Although this landing page isn’t bad by any means, it could be improved with a landing page that highlights Tumblr’s features and value proposition.

Tip #13: Include social proof on your landing page

An example of a landing page with social proof is a Mashable opt-in page. Their landing page includes user reviews and testimonials, which form their credibility.

They also highlight their awards, including “Best Mobile Site” from Forbes Magazine. Mashable not only provides evidence for why they’re good but also shows how much they’ve grown throughout the years. 

An example of a squeeze page without social proof is the Khan Academy landing page, and their landing page only includes the header and a call to action button. 

Although they have a large social media following that will drive traffic, the splash page doesn’t provide your Super Awesome company information about who they are or what their product does. 

This makes it difficult for people to sign up as there’s no evidence that the company provides value to those who use them.

Tip #14: Add humor and personality to your splash pages through good copywriting

An example of a squeeze page with humor and personality is the Drift landing page. They use interesting language such as “Significant others” instead of “business contacts.” 

You don’t have to be a professional landing page writer to add personality, and sometimes just inserting a few words with humor can do the trick and keep people interested in your landing page.

An example of a simple opt-in page and doesn’t have any personality is LinkedIn opt-in pages. Their splash page is mostly text, although they have an image on top of each landing page, so it’s not completely bland. 

However, they don’t use any unique language or add anything funny, making their opt-in pages less engaging than others.

Matrix Marketing Group

Tip #15: Optimize for mobile platforms

An example of a landing page that is optimized for the mobile platform is the Chanel splash page. 

Although their landing page isn’t the most interesting, it’s simple, and you can immediately see that it’s optimized for mobile platforms with its sidebar menu bar. Their splash page also links to their checkout page, making it easier for interested buyers to purchase Chanel products.

An example of a landing page that is not optimized for mobile platforms is an opt-in page on the Pulitzer Prize website. Each squeeze page contains articles about past winners, pictures, and important dates in Pulitzer history. 

However, because these are opt-in pages, they do not include any menus or links to make it easy for mobile visitors to navigate and find what they need.

A landing page is a landing web page, a web page where the goal is to get visitors to click on one or more links. A splash page can be used for anything, such as promoting new products, company information, announcements of events happening in the future, and more.

Common mistakes people make when designing landing pages

I’m going to talk about some of the most common mistakes people make when designing opt-in pages. 

The first one is not focusing on what the landing page needs to do. For example, a landing page can be created for many different things, such as landing a new employee, landing a new customer, or landing a potential investor. 

To know which type of landing page you need to create, make sure you identify your goal by using your keywords.

The second mistake is that putting images together with text will automatically make the landing page look good. 

Your landing page’s design doesn’t have to be put together only with images and text. If you’re selling an app and need a way for visitors to sign up and download it, you might want to consider creating an online landing page that has the landing page at the top, and then below it, there can be a big red play button with instructions on how to download the app.

This last mistake is not using opt-in pages correctly. A landing page is meant for getting clicks or conversions (in other words, actions taken by website visitors). 

Many people use landing pages as information sources to display helpful articles about their product or service. If this is what you’re trying to do, create a separate opt-in page for each of your posts.

Conclusion

Each one of these mistakes causes traffic to go down, specifically qualified traffic, if they are being made unknowingly. To avoid making them yourself when creating opt-in pages, check out Unbounce landing page resources.

I hope I’ve been able to help you avoid some landing page mistakes. For landing page design inspiration, check out this landing page here. 

This is a great landing page because it’s for a new product and does a good job of getting attention right away by having the headline “Introducing Your Super Awesome Co.”

Understand what their product looks like even before they click on the video. I also think that using the video as a second CTA is smart. 

Messaging isn’t clear yet about what Your Super Awesome company is or why people should buy it, but going to play an interactive globe makes me curious.

General FAQs

Do landing pages need any SEO strategies?

Landing pages do not need an SEO strategy in regards to landing pages themselves. Landing pages are typically designed for conversion, not ranking opportunities. The landing page is relevant to the landing page visitor, and it is company information is their sole action focus. You could have landing pages that promote other landing pages, it is so there may be some relevance, but it’s unlikely you’ll rank higher for competitive keywords anytime soon.”

How to create landing pages that convert?

The landing page I recommend is a landing page for a new product. The landing page should have a headline that grabs the reader’s attention and features all the necessary information about the product with top pictures, explaining what it does and who it is targeted towards, all without going into too much detail.

What is the best landing page design?

A landing page design that makes the most sense for landing pages is landing pages for travel destinations. This landing page design is interactive, engaging, and has a clear call to action.

What landing page do you recommend for a new product?

Yes. A landing page for a new product is a great idea. The landing page should have a headline that grabs the reader’s attention and features all the necessary information about the product with top pictures, explaining what it does and who it is targeted towards, all without going into too much detail. The viewer may not want to read through an entire paragraph before they can understand it, and they want to exit as fast as possible if they don’t find anything useful.

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